BAT WHITE NOSE SYNDROME - REPORTSSYNDROME DU MUSEAU BLANC DE LA CHAUVE-SOURIS - RAPPORTS

MENU :     OverviewAperçu | ReportsRapports | MapsCartes | Regional OutlookAperçu régional | ResourcesRessources | Bats Astray | InstructionsDirectives | Contact UsNous joindre

REPORTSRAPPORTS

Select yearSélectionnez un an :

Numbers correct as of July 4, 2019Ces nombres ont été mis à jour le 4 juillet 2019

SUMMARY BY PROVINCESOMMAIRE PAR PROVINCE 2019

ProvinceRégion SubmittedSoumis TestedTestés PositivePositif 1 SuspectPrésumés 2 NegativeNégatifs 3 PendingEn attente
Alberta 0 0 0 0 0 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 9 9 6 0 3 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 5 5 0 0 5 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 2 2 2 0 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ontario 1 1 1 0 0 0
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 1 1 0 0 1 0
Québec 0 0 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 5 5 0 0 5 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTAL 23 23 9 0 14 0

MAPSCARTES

(Click to see full sized image)(Cliquez pour voir l’image en taille réelle)

 

Diagnostic Criteria for Reporting Cases of Bat White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) at the individual specimen level

  1. Positive for WNS – Characteristic histologic lesions of WNS are present (Meteyer et al.) on an individual bat AND the bat is positive for Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) either by Muller et al. qPCR or by fungal culture.

  2. Suspect for WNS – (one of the following criteria must be met)

    a) Characteristic histologic lesions of WNS are present on an individual bat but Pd is not detected, the test result for Pd is inconclusive (either by Muller et al. qPCR or by fungal culture), or further testing for Pd is not performed.

    b) One or more field signs* are observed in a bat colony AND Pd is detected (either by Muller et al. qPCR, fungal culture, or a tapelift performed directly on visible fungal growth on bat skin) on at least one individual of the same species AND histopathology is negative or is not performed.

    c) MULTIPLE field signs* are observed among species known to be susceptible to WNS and are within the currently recognized range of WNS but no samples are collected for diagnostic evaluation.

    d) Individual bats that are part of a confirmed WNS morbidity/mortality event are submitted to, but not tested by, a diagnostician. This criterion is for instances in which multiple samples from the same site are submitted, but only a subset of those samples is tested. The untested samples may be classified as suspect for WNS if the subset of tested samples is Positive for WNS and consists of the same species as the untested samples. Representatives of all species involved in the disease event should be tested.


  3. Negative for WNS – Characteristic histologic lesions are not present AND bat is negative for Pd (either by Muller et al. qPCR or fungal culture).

Diagnostic Criteria for Reporting the Detection of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) at the individual specimen level in the absence of field signs of WNS

  1. 1. Pd PositivePd detected by Muller et al. qPCR or by fungal culture in accordance with laboratory-defined criteria in an environmental sample or on an individual bat with no other field signs of WNS* observed within the surveyed population. Bat carcasses submitted for diagnostic testing are placed in this category if Pd is detected on the carcass but there were no field signs of WNS observed on the individual AND histopathology is negative or is not performed. Repeat testing and/or independent secondary confirmation of Pd Positive results is warranted before this designation is applied to bat species of unknown susceptibility to WNS or areas outside the known geographic distribution of Pd.

  2. Inconclusive for Pd – Non-negative results by Muller et al. qPCR that are outside the range of accepted, standardized laboratory-defined criteria for Pd Positive. Results in this category may reflect the presence of minimal target DNA in the sample, representing a low-level Pd detection indicative of early infection. However, other possible explanations must be considered, such as contamination, non-specific amplification, or artifact from degradation of qPCR reaction components in the late stages of thermocycling. A designation of Inconclusive for Pd is made independent of other epidemiological evidence. Additional sampling and/or testing is warranted before broader inferences can be made about the presence of Pd at the survey site for official reporting purposes.

  3. Pd NegativePd is not detected (either by Muller et al. qPCR or fungal culture) in an environmental sample or on an individual bat. [Note: Although a negative qPCR or fungal culture result indicates that Pd was not detected in the tested sample, this does not guarantee the hibernaculum or bat colony from which the sample was collected is free of Pd. A lack of observed field signs* in the resident bat population is also not sufficient for assuming that a hibernaculum is Pd-free. Consistently negative results from a statistically robust sample size can, however, increase confidence that Pd is absent from the sampled population or environment.]

 

*Field Signs Associated with WNS in Bats

Winter/Spring – excessive or unexplained mortality at or near a hibernaculum; visible fungus on flight membranes, muzzle, or ears of live or fresh dead bats; abnormal behaviors including daytime activity, premature egression from the hibernaculum, or unexpected population shift to entrance of the hibernaculum; moderate to severe wing damage in nontorpid bats [Reichard et al.] or thin body condition (each considered a nonspecific field sign when observed by itself); yellow-orange fluorescent pattern of non-haired skin under UVA light [Turner et al.]

Summer/Fall – There are not consistent field signs associated with WNS during summer/fall.

Additional Comments

When screening for the presence of Pd, qPCR is preferred over fungal culture due to the greater sensitivity of the qPCR assay.
Results obtained using testing methodologies other than those referenced here will be considered preliminary and further testing with accepted standard methodologies is necessary for official reporting purposes.

For management purposes, hibernacula should be considered contaminated with Pd if they contain at least one sample (bat or environmental) that tests Pd Positive by the Muller et al. qPCR or fungal culture regardless of whether field signs of the disease were observed within the hibernaculum. A contaminated hibernaculum retains this designation indefinitely. The ability of Pd to persist long-term outside of hibernacula is not currently well understood.

Citations

Meteyer, C.U., E.L. Buckles, D.S. Blehert, A.C. Hicks, D.E. Green, V. Shearn-Bochsler, N.J. Thomas, A. Gargas, and M.J. Behr. 2009. Histopathologic crtieria to confirm white-nose syndrome in bats. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation 21: 411-414.

Muller, L.K., J.M. Lorch, D.L. Lindner, M. O’Connor, A. Gargas, and D.S. Blehert. 2013. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans. Mycologia 105: 253-259.

Reichard, J.D. and T.H. Kunz. 2009. White-nose syndrome inflicts lasting injuries to the wings of little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus). Acta Chriopterologica 11: 457-464.

Turner, G.G., C.U. Meteyer, H. Barton, J.F. Gumbs, D.M. Reeder, B. Overton, H. Bandouchova, T. Bartonička, N. Martínková, J. Pikula, J. Zukal, and D.S. Blehert. 2014. Non-lethal screening of bat-wing skin with the use of UV fluorescence to detect lesions indicative of white-nose syndrome. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 50: 566-573.

Catégories de diagnostic pour le rapport des cas de syndrome du museau blanc :

  1. Résultat positif pour le syndrome du museau blanc – Présence de lésions histologiques caractéristiques du syndrome du museau blanc chez les chauves-souris ET détection de Pseudogymnoascus (appelé antérieurement Geomycesdestructans (Pd) (soit par PCR de Muller et al. ou culture fongique).
  2. Présomption de syndrome du museau blanc – L’un des critères suivants doit être rempli :
    1. Présence de lésions histologiques caractéristiques du syndrome du museau blanc, mais NON détection de Pd  (soit par PCR de Muller et al. ou culture fongique).
    2. Observation d’un ou plusieurs signes cliniques ou environnementaux (voir plus bas) ET détection de Pd (soit par PCR de Muller et al., culture fongique ou application de lames autocollantes (tapelift) directement sur la croissance fongique apparente ou sur la peau de la chauve-souris).
    3. Observation de  MULTIPLES signes cliniques ou environnementaux (voir plus bas) dans l’aire où le syndrome est confirmé à l’heure actuelle sans prélèvement d’échantillons à des fins de diagnostic.
    4. Soumission de chauves-souris lors d’un événement de morbidité ou mortalité confirmé comme étant dû au syndrome du museau blanc en l’absence de tests de laboratoire. Ce critère s’applique dans les cas où de nombreux échantillons provenant d’un même site ont déjà été soumis, mais que seul un sous-ensemble a été testé. Lorsqu’on a obtenu des résultats positifs pour le sous-ensemble testé et qu’il s’agit de la même espèce, on peut classer ces échantillons dans la catégorie « présomption » de syndrome du museau blanc. Il faut tester des représentants de toutes les espèces touchées par la maladie.
  3. Résultat négatif pour le syndrome du museau blanc – Absence de lésions histologiques ET non détection de Pd  (soit par PCR de Muller et al. ou culture fongique).

Catégories à utiliser pour rapporter la détection de  Pd :

  1. Détection de Pd Détection de Pd dans un échantillon environnemental ou chez des chauves-souris ne présentant aucun des signes cliniques ou environnementaux du syndrome du museau blanc (voir plus bas) observés dans la population de l’hibernacle (soit par PCR de Muller et al. ou culture fongique). **Il est préférable d’utiliser un test PCR pour le dépistage de Pd compte tenu de sa plus grande sensibilité comparativement à une culture fongique). Les carcasses de chauves-souris soumises pour des tests diagnostiques peuvent être classées dans cette catégorie lorsque Pd a été détecté sur les carcasses en l’absence de signes cliniques ou environnementaux du syndrome (voir plus bas) sur le site de collecte en l’absence de lésions histologiques.
  2. Non détection de Pd Non détection de Pd (soit par PCR de Muller et al. ou culture fongique) (Voir **dans la section précédente) dans un échantillon environnemental ou chez des chauves-souris en particulier. [NOTE : Un test PCR négatif indique une quantité de Pd inférieure au seuil de détection requis. Cela ne garantit pas l’absence de Pd chez la population de l’hibernacle. Par ailleurs, la non-observation de signes environnementaux chez les chauves-souris ne permet pas de présumer que l’hibernacle est exempt de Pd. Un résultat négatif obtenu à partir d’un échantillon de taille acceptable sur le plan statistique peut toutefois permettre de supposer l’absence de Pd dans la population échantillonnée ou l’environnement.] .

À des fins de gestion, l’hibernacle doit être considéré infecté de Pd lorsqu’on y retrouve au moins un échantillon (provenant d’une chauve-souris ou environnemental) ayant obtenu un résultat positif par PCR de Muller et al. ou culture fongique, peu importe si on a observé ou non des signes environnementaux de la maladie dans l’hibernacle. Un hibernacle contaminé conserve cette classification indéfiniment. À l’heure actuelle, on ne connaît pas vraiment la persistance à long terme de Pd à l’extérieur de l’hibernacle.
Signes cliniques ou environnementaux associés au syndrome du museau blanc de la chauve-souris:

  1. Hiver/printemps – Mortalité excessive ou inexpliquée dans l’hibernacle ou aux environs de celui-ci. Observation de fungus sur les membranes des ailes, le museau ou les oreilles de chauves-souris vivantes ou ayant succombé récemment. Modèle fluorescent jaune-orangé (par utilisation de rayons UVA) sur la peau non recouverte de poils. Comportements anormaux, comme activité diurne, égression prématurée de l’hibernacle ou changement de population observé lors de l’entrée dans l’hibernacle. Lésions modérées ou sévères sur les ailes de chauves-souris sorties de leur torpeur [Reichard et al.] et émaciation (NOTE : Ces deux derniers signes sont considérés non spécifiques lorsqu’ils sont les seuls observés.)
  2. Été/automne – Aucun signe environnemental uniforme n’est associé au syndrome du nez blanc pendant l’été et l’automne.

Muller, L.K., J.M. Lorch, D.L. Lindner, M. O’Connor, A. Gargas, and D.S. Blehert. 2013. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans. Mycologia 105: 253-259.